IP Publishing logo IP Publishing Ltd
Tourism Economics Logo cover Tourism Economics Logo Tourism Economics Logo cover

The business and finance of tourism and recreation

ISSN 1354-8166 (print); 2044-0375 (online)


Editor: Stephen Wanhill,
Professor of Tourism Economics,
University of Limerick,
and Emeritus Professor of Tourism
Research, Bournemouth University

This journal is covered by Thomson Reuters in the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) and Current Contents/Social and Behavioral Sciences. Impact Factor: 0.515. 5-Year Impact Factor: 0.745. (Journal Citation Reports®, 2015 release, Thomson Reuters.)

This journal is indexed in Scopus

Download the journal brochure

Recommend this journal to your library

Publication ethics and publication malpractice

Increase exposure of your paper

Clockss logo

Award For Excellence

Editorial coverage

Tourism Economics, published bimonthly, covers the business aspects of tourism in the wider context. It takes account of constraints on development, such as social and community interests and the sustainable use of tourism and recreation resources, and inputs into the production process. The definition of tourism used includes tourist trips taken for all purposes, embracing both stay and day visitors.

Articles address the components of the tourism product (accommodation; restaurants; merchandizing; attractions; transport; entertainment; tourist activities); and the economic organization of tourism at micro and macro levels (market structure; role of public/private sectors; community interests; strategic planning; marketing; finance; economic development).

Core subject areas:

  • forecasting
  • public policy (strategies, fiscal and other intervention policies)
  • economic development
  • market structures and competition
  • sources of capital provision
  • labour economics (quality and productivity issues)
  • business aspects of marketing
  • private and public sector interaction
  • economic appraisal at sector and project level
  • mathematical modelling
  • developments in the components of the product
  • structure of the tourism industry (including such issues as ownership, corporate size, international operations, etc)
  • regional economic effects of tourism developments
  • analysis of international data on tourism, such as WTO statistics

Submissions - Notes for authors

Please send papers by e-mail to Professor Stephen Wanhill, c/o  JEdmondson(at)ippublishing.com (this address is obtainable by clicking on Professor Wanhill's name in the preceding sentence). Receipt of your paper will be acknowledged by e-mail and it will then be forwarded to Professor Wanhill.

Length and presentation of contributions

 Papers will normally be about 5,000 words long. However, this is by no means inflexible and substantially shorter or longer papers will be considered where appropriate. Research notes and shorter report-style pieces will also be considered (1,500-2,000 words).

Submissions should be double-spaced. They can be sent to the editor either by e-mail or post c/o the publisher (details above). The publisher will send an acknowledgement on receipt of submissions. Electronic versions must be in Word (postal submissions should include one hard copy and a disk or CD).

The title page should contain full names and addresses of the authors and their affiliations. As this page will not be forwarded to referees, the title of the article (without authors) should be repeated on the first page of the text.

An abstract should be provided, comprising 100-150 words. Between 3 and 6 keywords should appear below the abstract, highlighting the main topics of the paper. The text should be organized under appropriate cross-headings (not numbered paragraphs) and where possible these should be not more than 800 words apart.

References should follow the Harvard system. That is, they should be shown within the text as the author's surname (or authors' surnames) followed by a comma and the year of publication, all in round brackets: for example, (Smith, 1998). For textual citations, where there are two authors please use the word 'and', not the ampersand (thus: '(Smith and Jones, 2012)'. Where there are more than two authors, please use the first-named author only, followed by 'et al' in italics (thus: Smith et al, 2012). At the end of the article a bibliographical list should be supplied, organized alphabetically by author (surnames followed by initials - all authors should be named). Bibliographic information should be given in the order indicated by the following examples:

Articles: Figini, P., and Vici, L. (2010), ‘Tourism and growth in a cross section of countries’, Tourism Economics, Vol 16, No 4, December 2010.

Books: Dwyer, L., Forsyth, P., and Dwyer, W. (2010), Tourism Economics and Policy, Channel View, Bristol.

Notes should be numbered consecutively in the text and typed in plain text at the end of the paper (not as footnotes on text pages).

Tables and illustrations should be presented separately at the end of the text. Authors should bear in mind that, in the print version of the journal, illustrations will be reproduced in black and white.

Prior Publication

Articles are received on the understanding that they are original contributions, and have not been published officially, either in print or electronic form, or submitted for publication elsewhere. In this respect, ‘discussion’ or ‘working’ papers, conference presentations and proceedings are not considered to be official publications, unless they have been formally deemed so by conference organizers, or presented as edited works through recognized publishing channels. If in doubt, authors are asked to draw the attention of the Editor to any prior dissemination of the paper in their letter of submission. Please note that articles should not be posted on personal Websites or social networking sites before or after submission.

Refereeing

All papers, other than research notes and reports, will be subject to a 'double blind' review - i.e. the anonymity of both authors and referees will be maintained throughout the refereeing process. There will be a minimum of two referees for each paper. Papers by authors who are not academics (such as submissions from industry) will also be subject to review before acceptance, but their distinct nature and aims will be fully taken into account.

Copyright

Authors will be asked to assign copyright, where possible, to IP Publishing Ltd. Relevant authors’ rights are protected.

Author Checklist for Final versions

Editorial Board

Editor: Stephen Wanhill, Professor of Tourism Economics, University of Limerick, and Emeritus Professor of Tourism Research, Bournemouth University, c/o IP Publishing Ltd, 4th Floor, Hamilton House, Mabledon Place, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 9BB, UK.

Special Advisers
  • Professor John Fletcher, International Centre for Tourism and Hospitality Research,
    Bournemouth University, UK
  • Professor William C. Gartner, Tourism Center,
    University of Minnesota, USA
  • Professor J. Mazanec, MODUL University
    Vienna, Austria
  • Professor Lindsay W. Turner, School of Applied Economics
    Victoria University, Australia

Editorial Advisory Board

  • Professor Eugeni Aguiló
    Universitat de les Illes Balears, Spain
  • Dr Albert Assaf
    University of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA
  • Professor Esteban Bardolet
    Universitat de les Illes Balears, Spain
  • Professor Carlos Pestana Barros
    Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Professor Juan Gabriel Brida
    Universidad de la República
    Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Professor Nevenka Čavlek
    University of Zagreb, Croatia
  • Professor Jim Deegan
    University of Limerick, Ireland
  • Dr Sarath Divisekera
    Victoria University of Technology, Australia
  • Professor Larry Dwyer
    University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Professor Peter Forsyth
    Monash University, Australia
  • Professor D.C. Frechtling
    The George Washington University, USA
  • Dr Twan Huybers
    University of New South Wales, Australia
  • Dr Stanislav Ivanov
    International University College, Bulgaria
  • Professor Carson L. Jenkins
    University of Strathclyde, UK
  • Professor Woo Gon (Woody) Kim
    Florida State University, USA
  • Professor Brian King
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
  • Professor Adele Ladkin
    Bournemouth University, UK
  • Dr Peter Morrell
    Cranfield University, UK
  • Professor Yasuo Ohe
    Chiba University, Japan
  • Professor Andrea Saayman
    North-West University, South Africa
  • Dr Mondher Sahli
    Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Dr Neelu Seetaram
    Bournemouth University, UK
  • Professor Egon Smeral
    MODUL University, Austria
  • Professor Haiyan Song
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, PR China
  • Professor Natalie Stoeckl
    James Cook University, Australia
  • Dr Brian Terry
    Terry & Partners, UK
  • Professor John Westlake
    Prince of Songkla University, Thailand

Vol 21 No 6 December 2015

SPECIAL FOCUS: ANALYSIS OF TOURISM DESTINATION DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA AND SPAIN
Guest Editor: Yuhua Luo

1131 Introduction

1133 The impact of tourism development on local residents in Bama, Guangxi, China

Yaping Liu, Linlin Nie, Fuqiang Wang and Zhulan Nie

1149 A study of traveller decision-making determinants: prioritizing destination or travel mode?

Jaume Garcia, Catalina Juaneda, Josep María Raya and Francesc Sastre

1169 Analysis of core stakeholder behaviour in the tourism community using economic game theory

Zhenzhi Yang, Hong Shi, Dan Yang, Yinchun Cai and Xuanyu Ren

1189 The direct and combined effects of training on hotel performance

Dolores García and María Tugores

1207 Are regional political decisions the key element in reducing seasonal variation in tourism? The case of the Balearic Islands

María Antonia García Sastre, Margarita Alemany Hormaeche and Miguel Trías Villar

1221 Tourism demand analysis of Chinese arrivals in Thailand

Akarapong Untong, Vicente Ramos, Mingsarn Kaosa-Ard and Javier Rey-Maquieira

OTHER PAPERS:

1235 Tourism destination competitiveness: the Spanish Mediterranean case

Antonio García Sánchez and David Siles López

1255 Market reaction to bidder announcements of horizontal mergers in an oligopolistic industry: evidence from the US airline industry

Leonard A. Jackson

1273 A model of market positioning based on value creation and service quality in the lodging industry: an empirical application of online customer reviews

Manuel Rodríguez Díaz, Tomás F. Espino Rodríguez and Rosa Rodríguez Díaz

1295 Research report: Philippine Airlines – flying in a changing landscape

John F. O’Connell and Karel Vanoverbeke

1309 Research note: Nowcasting tourist arrivals in Barbados – just Google it!

Mahalia Jackman and Simon Naitram

1315 Research note: Evaluation and projection of economic indicators of tourism development in Kazakhstan

Bakyt Syzdykbayeva, Zhanarys Raimbekov, Darmeniar Khydyrbekuly, Madina Temirbulatova and Almas Bayandinova

1323 Research note: Exaggeration bias-corrected contingent valuation method: the case of Olle Trail

Won Seok Lee, Choong-Ki Lee, Yooshik Yoon and Jihee Kim

1331 Research note: The impact of marketing expenditure on international tourism demand for the Cook Islands

Faruk Balli, Hatice O. Balli and Nikau Tangaroa

1344 The Thea Sinclair Award for Journal Article Excellence, 2014

1345 Index to Volume 21, 2015


Title: The impact of tourism development on local residents in Bama, Guangxi, China

Author(s): Yaping Liu, Linlin Nie, Fuqiang Wang and Zhulan Nie

Abstract: Researchers have studied both the positive and negative impacts of tourism. Bama, one of the world’s top five ‘longevity’ villages, has enjoyed a rapid increase in tourism visits and income in recent years. However, current developments are accompanied by various environmental and social issues that threaten the local community. Though most indigenous people in Bama earn more than before, they are seldom involved in the distribution of fair benefits and the decision-making processes affecting the village. Based on three surveys conducted in 2009, 2011 and 2013, this paper examines changes in the perception of tourism’s impact and the supportive attitude of the local residents. Suggestions are made for improving the development of tourism in Bama.

Read the full article here

Title: A study of traveller decision-making determinants: prioritizing destination or travel mode?

Author(s): Jaume Garcia, Catalina Juaneda, Josep María Raya and Francesc Sastre

Abstract: This paper focuses on how travellers prioritize their choices in making a final decision on their holiday destination and travel conditions, especially on how they consider the ‘all- inclusive’ travel mode. The authors use 1,065 observations from a visitor exit survey (in two waves: 2006 and 2012) to examine the determinants of prioritizing destination choice or travel mode in the holiday decision-making process. Estimating a multinomial model, they find that the decision structure of those individuals who prioritize destination is different from that of those who prioritize the travel mode. The paper also contributes to research on the intention to return to a destination related to the intention to repeat the same holiday formula. The authors distinguish between those tourists who prioritize destination choice and those who prioritize the travel mode. Through an estimated sequential model, they present the results of the revisiting patterns for these two groups.

Read the full article here

Title: Analysis of core stakeholder behaviour in the tourism community using economic game theory

Author(s): Zhenzhi Yang, Hong Shi, Dan Yang, Yinchun Cai and Xuanyu Ren

Abstract: In a Nash equilibrium, every participant’s strategy is the optimal reaction to the strategies of others. Based on economic theory, this paper analyses core stakeholders’ behaviour in the tourism community at Qingcheng Mountain, Chengdu, China. Taking taxation, land prices and employment as the payoffs, and the local government, the community and the investors as the players, the incomplete information static game model is applied to outline the stakeholders’ behaviour. The paper also examines who benefits the most and who occupies a dominant position. The results indicate that the game strategy of residents in Qingcheng Mountain is influenced by the investors. The influence of the investors is also crucial in the decision making mechanism of the tourism community to maintain sustainable tourism development.

Read the full article here

Title: The direct and combined effects of training on hotel performance

Author(s): Dolores García and María Tugores

Abstract: The role of human capital variables in the economic performance of agents has been widely analysed in the economics literature. In the field of tourism, various studies have addressed these relationships. However, studies focusing on the direct impact of human capital on firm performance in the industry are scarce. This paper analyses the determinants of the economic performance of firms for a representative sample of hotels in Majorca, focusing on human capital aspects, and on-the-job training in particular. Several measures are used to capture different aspects of the hotels’ performance. The results show that, while several human capital variables help to explain performance to a certain extent, training stands out, both by itself and in combination with the innovation and category variable. Interestingly, training and innovative investments behave as complementary or substituting factors depending on the nature of innovations. On the other hand, returns from training decrease with the rise of hotel category.

Read the full article here

Title: Are regional political decisions the key element in reducing seasonal variation in tourism? The case of the Balearic Islands

Author(s): María Antonia García Sastre, Margarita Alemany Hormaeche and Miguel Trías Villar

Abstract: As a mature tourism destination, the Balearic Islands suffer the normal effects of the stagnation stage of the tourism area life cycle (TALC) model. During stagnation, reorientation policies are used in an attempt to mitigate some of those effects in order to reduce the prevalence of seasonality. Various planning instruments have been designed and implemented by successive local governments, a key priority being the attempt to find a strategic answer to reducing this phenomenon. Based on the analysis of successive marketing plans of the Autonomous Region of the Balearic Islands, and using the Gini index to measure seasonality, this study explores the link between the two and demonstrates that regional political policies adopted over the last 20 years have not reduced seasonal variation in tourism. The demand remains at the same levels of seasonality as in the 1990s, suggesting the ineffectiveness of the policies implemented.

Read the full article here

Title: Tourism demand analysis of Chinese arrivals in Thailand

Author(s): Akarapong Untong, Vicente Ramos, Mingsarn Kaosa-Ard and Javier Rey-Maquieira

Abstract: This paper analyses Chinese tourist arrivals in Thailand during the last 25 years using various quantitative techniques. The number of Chinese tourists in Thailand has been increasing for two decades but since 2009 the trend has been particularly dramatic, with a 56.84% annual growth rate. The study found an increase of seasonality, but arrivals showed the same yearly pattern. Income elasticity indicates that Thailand will continue to benefit from China’s economic growth. In addition, Chinese tourists respond less to a change in Thailand’s prices than to changes in competitors’ prices. In 2017, Chinese arrivals are forecast to reach 7.9 million with an annual growth rate of 19.98% since 2013. Therefore, Thailand should focus on capacity preparation for this market growth while monitoring the policies of its major competitors in the China outbound market.

Read the full article here

Title: Tourism destination competitiveness: the Spanish Mediterranean case

Author(s): Antonio García Sánchez and David Siles López

Abstract: The authors analyse the concept of competitiveness and then apply this concept to tourist destinations. The objective is to measure tourism destination competitiveness in the regions of the Spanish Mediterranean coast to provide tourism policymakers with tools to improve destination competitiveness. Through a review of the literature, the authors identify the indicators that may explain competitiveness. They then select the variables and determine their quantitative effect on destination competitiveness in Spanish Mediterranean regions. The findings enable a better understanding of tourism destination competitiveness. Finally, the authors comment on the relationship between competitiveness and prosperity.

Read the full article here

Title: Market reaction to bidder announcements of horizontal mergers in an oligopolistic industry: evidence from the US airline industry

Author(s): Leonard A. Jackson

Abstract: Mergers among US domiciled airlines have increased in recent years. These mergers are attempts by airlines to assuage operational and financial challenges and to obtain actual or ostensible benefits, including efficiency and market power gains, and improve competitive position. This study investigates the market reaction to merger announcements by bidder firms in the US airline industry, an oligopolistic industry, during the period 1985–2013. Results of the analysis show significant positive reaction to the announcements. The findings suggest that the market perceives these merger transactions as value-relevant events for bidders. In addition, the findings are consistent with the semi- strong form of the efficient market hypothesis.

Read the full article here

Title: A model of market positioning based on value creation and service quality in the lodging industry: an empirical application of online customer reviews

Author(s): Manuel Rodríguez Díaz, Tomás F. Espino Rodríguez and Rosa Rodríguez Díaz

Abstract: The aim of this paper is to develop a methodology to analyse and position tourism firms based on the value creation concept. An empirical study was carried out using customer evaluations of lodging companies available on the website of Booking.com. Based on this information, three new variables were created to analyse the competitive positioning of firms in a specific tourism destination: ‘quality’, ‘value’ and ‘added value’; and a measurement method was proposed. The result is a manageable methodology that can be used by practitioners and researchers to analyse the lodging market and companies’ positioning. The findings show that value is a subjective concept that depends on customers’ expectations. Finally, the methodology was implemented in a specific case to show its capacity to analyse market positioning.

Read the full article here

Title: Research report: Philippine Airlines – flying in a changing landscape

Author(s): John F. O’Connell and Karel Vanoverbeke

Abstract: This paper discusses the issues facing Philippine Airlines in its ever evolving and changing landscape in the domestic, regional and international markets. The Philippine aviation industry had its safety status downgraded to Category 2 for six years by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the US Federal Aviation Administration. This downgrading of the status severely limited Philippine Airlines from expanding internationally, but its reinstatement provides huge opportunities for the incumbent. However, in the domestic and regional markets it faces a threat from rapidly encroaching low-cost carriers. The Philippines has the highest domestic low-cost carrier penetration rate in the world, while the incumbent has rebranded its low-cost subsidiary, AirPhil, to a full-service carrier, PAL Express, which has impacted its ability to compete in short-haul markets. Philippine Airlines’ new routes to the Middle East and Europe have the potential to be profitable, but their success is hampered by the lack of domestic connectivity and no feeder traffic from partner airlines.

Read the full article here

Title: Research note: Nowcasting tourist arrivals in Barbados – just Google it!

Author(s): Mahalia Jackman and Simon Naitram

Abstract: This paper uses support vector regressions (SVRs) and Google search data to test whether observing Internet habits can provide insights into trends in tourist arrivals in Barbados. The empirical evidence suggests that Google Trends data may be used to pick up changing patterns and trends in tourist arrivals from the UK and Canada. In the case of the USA, the authors find no evidence to suggest that Google data add any significant information to what can be ‘learned’ from an autoregressive SVR.

Read the full article here

Title: Research note: Evaluation and projection of economic indicators of tourism development in Kazakhstan

Author(s): Bakyt Syzdykbayeva, Zhanarys Raimbekov, Darmeniar Khydyrbekuly, Madina Temirbulatova and Almas Bayandinova

Abstract: This paper reviews the results of an analysis of the tourism industry in Kazakhstan, which has great potential for development. Despite the favourable conditions for tourism business development and the tourist and recreational resources in Kazakhstan, there are several problems. The authors discuss the factors constraining the functioning and development of tourist activity. They present an evaluation of the efficiency of, and prospects for, tourism operations in the country and identify forward-looking economic indicators for the tourism industry.

Read the full article here

Title: Research note: Exaggeration bias-corrected contingent valuation method: the case of Olle Trail

Author(s): Won Seok Lee, Choong-Ki Lee, Yooshik Yoon and Jihee Kim

Abstract: Researchers have criticized the traditional contingent valuation method (CVM) due to its potential response bias. To address this bias, several studies have employed improved CVM survey designs. When respondents disguise the truth, non-sampling errors are created that cannot be corrected by these elaborate survey modifications. To reduce this type of non-sampling error, Park and MacLachlan (2008) suggested the exaggeration bias-corrected (EBC) CVM, which assumes a functional mechanism between real and spurious willingness to pay (WTP). The authors verify the effectiveness of the EBC-CVM in non-sampling error reduction, which in turn derives more error- corrected economic value. Few studies have employed the EBC-CVM in a tourism context. The main goals of this study are to introduce EBC-CVM and to test its validity in a tourism study. The results indicate that EBC-CVM contributes to the reduction of non-sampling errors. The implications of the findings are discussed.

Read the full article here

Title: Research note: The impact of marketing expenditure on international tourism demand for the Cook Islands

Author(s): Faruk Balli, Hatice O. Balli and Nikau Tangaroa

Abstract: This paper examines the impact of internal and external factors on the increase in international tourism demand for the Cook Islands for the period 2000–2012. The authors find that the key internal factor, the growth in destination marketing by the Cook Islands Tourism Corporation representatives in major markets, has had a positive and significant effect on the increase in the Cook Islands’ visitor inflow. The boost in marketing expenditure has also created a remarkable change in the decomposition of the visitor flows from major countries.

Read the full article here

Copyright 2016 IP Publishing Ltd.