IP Publishing logo IP Publishing Ltd
Outlook On Agriculture cover Outlook on Agriculture logo Outlook On Agriculture cover

The international journal devoted to agricultural science, policy and strategy.

ISSN 0030-7270 (print); 2043-6866 (online)


Editor: Dr Jerry Knox

This journal is covered by Thomson Reuters in the Science Citation Index, the Science Citation Index Expanded, Current Contents/Agriculture, Biology & Environmental Sciences, and BIOSIS Previews. Impact Factor: 0.478. 5-Year Impact Factor: 0.692. (Journal Citation Reports®, 2015 release, Thomson Reuters.).

This journal is indexed in Scopus

Download the journal brochure

Recommend this journal to your library

Publication ethics and publication malpractice

Increase exposure of your paper

Clockss logo

Editorial coverage

Outlook on Agriculture is published quarterly and welcomes original research papers, research notes, invited reviews and commentary for an international and interdisciplinary readership. Special attention is paid to agricultural policy, international trade in the agricultural sector, strategic developments in food production, the links between agricultural systems and food security, the role of agriculture in social and economic development, agriculture in developing countries and environmental issues, including natural resources for agriculture and climate impacts. Articles should be in the region of 4,000 words; relevant literature should be cited with a recommended limit of 30 references.

Submissions - Notes for authors

Outlook on Agriculture uses an online webtool called Editman for manuscript submission, review and feedback. Please follow the link below to submit your manuscript through Editman:

http://www.editman.co/

You will first need to register with Editman and then upload details regarding your manuscript. The process is quick and straightforward. Once complete, you will receive an acknowledgement and your paper will then be screened for journal relevance.

Length and presentation of contributions

Articles should be in the region of 4,000 words. Research notes and shorter pieces will also be considered for publication. In addition, papers derived from work done under the EU Research Framework Programme will be readily considered. Submissions should be double-spaced. Electronic versions must be in Word.

The text should be ordered under appropriate sub-headings (not numbered paragraphs or sections) and where possible these should not be more than 800 words apart. Three levels of sub-heading are possible.

The title page should show the names and addresses of the authors, their professional status and affiliation and the address (including e-mail) to which correspondence should be sent. As this page will not be sent to referees, the title of the article (without author names) should be repeated on the first text page.

An abstract should be provided, comprising 100-150 words.

Between 3 and 6 keywords should appear below the abstract, highlighting the main topics of the paper. References should follow the Harvard system. That is, they should be shown within the text as the author's surname (or authors' surnames) followed by a comma and the year of publication, all in round brackets: for example, (Smith, 1998). For textual citations, where there are two authors please use the word 'and', not the ampersand (thus: '(Smith and Jones, 2012)'. Where there are more than two authors, please use the first-named author only, followed by 'et al' in italics (thus: Smith et al, 2012). At the end of the article a bibliographical list should be supplied, organized alphabetically by author (surnames followed by initials - all authors should be named). Bibliographic information should be given in the order indicated by the following examples: 

Articles: Wheeler, T., and Kay, M. (2010), ‘Food crop production, water and climate change in the developing world’, Outlook on Agriculture, Vol 39, No 4, pp 239–243.

Books: Lovelock, J. (2009), The Vanishing Face of Gaia: a Final Warning, Allen Lane, London.

Notes should be numbered consecutively in the text and typed in plain text at the end of the paper (not as footnotes on text pages).

Tables should be reduced to the simplest form and present only essential data. They should be submitted on separate sheets at the end of the article. The use of vertical rules in tables should be avoided.

For illustrations, line drawings and photographs are acceptable. Authors are asked to supply originals of line drawings for reproduction. Photographs should be glossy prints with good contrast. Authors should bear in mind that colour illustrations will be reproduced in black and white in the print version of the journal.

Prior Publication

Articles are received on the understanding that they are original contributions, and have not been published officially, either in print or electronic form, or submitted for publication elsewhere. In this respect, ‘discussion’ or ‘working’ papers, conference presentations and proceedings are not considered to be official publications, unless they have been formally deemed so by conference organizers, or presented as edited works through recognized publishing channels. If in doubt, authors are asked to draw the attention of the Editor to any prior dissemination of the paper in their letter of submission. Please note that articles should not be posted on personal Websites or social networking sites before or after submission.

Refereeing

Other than research notes, reports, and personal opinion pieces, articles will be refereed. Papers by authors who are not academics (eg submissions from industry) will also be subject to review before acceptance, but their distinct nature and aims will be fully taken into account.

Copyright

Authors will be asked to assign copyright, where possible, to IP Publishing Ltd. Relevant authors’ rights are protected.

Author Checklist for Final versions

Editorial Board

  • Editor: Dr Jerry Knox, Cranfield Institute for Water Science, Dept of Environmental Science and Technology, Cranfield University, Bedford MK43 0AL, UK. E-mail: j.knox(a)cranfield.ac.uk
  • Consulting Editor: Dr David Lister, Somerset, UK

Editorial Advisory Board

  • Professor P.K. Aggarwal
    Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India
  • Dr Simon Anderson
    International Institute for Environment and Development, UK
  • Professor Deng Xi-Ping
    Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Dr C. Devendra
    Consulting Tropical Animal Production Specialist, Malaysia
  • Dr R. C. Hardwick
    Brussels, Belgium
  • Dr Alfred Hartemink
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
  • Hsin Huang
    International Meat Secretariat, France
  • Dr Jill Lenne
    Consulting Tropical Agriculture Specialist, Fyvie, UK
  • Dr Antoinette Mannion
    Department of Geography, University of Reading, UK
  • Professor Graham Matthews
    Imperial College London, UK
  • Dr Sushil Pandey
    International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines
  • Dr Thomas Fitz Randolph
    International Livestock Research Institute, Kenya
  • Dr Fabrice Renaud
    United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security (UNU-EHS), Germany
  • Dr J. Sumberg
    Institute of Development Studies, UK
  • Professor Guido van Huylenbroeck
    Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Professor J. Van Staden
    Research Centre for Plant Growth & Development, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

December 2015 Issue (VOL 44 NO 4)

257 Climate change adaptation and mitigation in agriculture, forestry and water management at the regional scale: a case study from the North German Plain

Tim Barkmann, Rosemarie Siebert and Andrej Lange

267 Effect of within-season daily rainfall distribution on maize crop yields

Kevin Jan Duffy and Tirivashe Phillip Masere

273 Quantifying the hydrological response to water conservation measures and climatic variability in the Yihe River Basin, China

Muhammad Saifullah, Zhijia Li, Qiaoling Li, Sarfraz Hashim and Muhammad Zaman

283 A new approach to support site-specific farming and economic decision making for precision agriculture in East Germany: the heterogeneity indicator

Isabella Karpinski, Johannes Schuler and Klaus Müller

291 Community-based organic agriculture in the Philippines

Jungho Suh

297 One size policy does not fit all: latent farmer groups in crop insurance markets in Finland

Sami Myyrä and Petri Liesivaara

303 Influence of the CAP reform on livestock: outlook for selected European regions by 2020

Giacomo Giannoccaro, Rosaria Viscecchia and Bernardo C. De Gennaro

309 A meta-regression analysis of price transmission estimates in Sub-Saharan Africa

Joseph Amikuzuno and Kolawole Ogundari

315 Index to Volume 44, 2015


Title: Climate change adaptation and mitigation in agriculture, forestry and water management at the regional scale: a case study from the North German Plain

Author(s): Tim Barkmann, Rosemarie Siebert and Andrej Lange Abstract: Adaptation and mitigation measures are important in dealing with climate change impacts on agriculture, forestry and water management. Stakeholders have an important role to play in coping with climate change at the regional scale, so it is important to identify which measures they are aware of and which they have implemented. This paper describes the regional adaptation and mitigation measures taken by stakeholders in northern Germany and the connections between the sectoral measures and the spatial scales involved. The study finds that adaptation measures have either been implemented or chosen at the regional scale; that adaptation plays an important role at the regional scale whilst mitigation measures are almost non-existent; that water-related issues link the land use sectors examined; and that experts clearly view the national level as the appropriate level for policy makers to exert political influence on measures relating to climate change.

Read the full article here

Title: Effect of within-season daily rainfall distribution on maize crop yields

Author(s): Kevin Jan Duffy and Tirivashe Phillip Masere

Abstract: It is well known that major changes in global food systems are needed when agriculture must meet the challenge of feeding a growing population and at the same time minimize global environmental impacts. Both these aims require optimal crop yields. This need applies crucially to staple foods, such as maize, and in developing parts of the world, such as much of Africa. Within- season rainfall will affect crop yields, and this paper, using simulations, investigates the effects of varying within-season daily rainfall distributions on potential maize yields. The results show that within-season distributions can affect maize yields in low-rainfall seasons, but yields are also dependent on the use of fertilizer. In average and above-average rainfall seasons, within-season variance has little effect on maize yields. If within-season distributions affect crop yields in low-rainfall seasons, as shown here, then this finding could be important for understanding the impacts of possible changes in climate.

Read the full article here

Title: Quantifying the hydrological response to water conservation measures and climatic variability in the Yihe River Basin, China

Author(s): Muhammad Saifullah, Zhijia Li, Qiaoling Li, Sarfraz Hashim and Muhammad Zaman

Abstract: In this study, variations in the hydrological responses of the Yihe agricultural watershed in the Yihe River Basin in China were analysed based on decadal period data from 1961 to 2011. Precipitation and streamflow data showed a positive trend and evapotranspiration a negative trend. Human activities dominated in the basin for the study period, but the results show inconsistencies between 1989 and 2011. The contribution of human activities and climate variability were quantified through simple linear regression and a physically based modelling approach (hydrological sensitivity). The results suggest that the streamflow of the Dongwan Basin has decreased compared to the baseline period (1961–1968). The contributions of human activities and climate variability were 17% and 83% for 1970–2011 using a simple linear regression approach. The hydrological sensitivity method quantified 119% and –19% of human activities and climate variability respectively for the same period.

Read the full article here

Title: A new approach to support site-specific farming and economic decision making for precision agriculture in East Germany: the heterogeneity indicator

Author(s): Isabella Karpinski, Johannes Schuler and Klaus Müller

Abstract: Small spatial differences in field conditions can strongly influence plant growth and create difficulties in terms of defining optimal crop management practices. Precision agriculture (PA) is considered to offer an optimal solution since it can adapt cultivation measures to small-scale in-field heterogeneity. Furthermore, it can potentially create environmental benefits through more efficient use of inputs. Since research on decision support is lacking with regard to the economic consequences of PA implementation, the authors use this heterogeneity as an indicator for an assessment of the benefits of PA. A new approach for using a site-specific heterogeneity indicator (HEI) that is linked to economics is presented. The HEI is defined as the coefficient of variation in annual field yield. Based on a study in East Germany between 2005 and 2007, an HEI threshold value of 17% for profitable PA was identified based on individual and external benefits. Grounded in more detailed data, the HEI could serve as a useful decision-support tool for farmers in deciding whether or not to implement PA.

Read the full article here

Title: Community-based organic agriculture in the Philippines

Author(s): Jungho Suh

Abstract: This paper explores institutional mechanisms that might be required to boost both organic agriculture and rural development in the Philippines. Special attention is paid to community-based organic agriculture as a pathway to rural development. The Philippines has two decades of experience of community-based natural resource management. Unlike public natural resources such as forests, watersheds or fisheries, however, the community-based organic agriculture programme is intended to deal with the private property regime. Thus, if the programme is to be successful, agrarian land reform must continue. Integrated rice–duck farming is among the suitable and viable options for organic agriculture, given that rice is a major agricultural crop and duck meat is popular in the Philippines. Area-based organic food certification systems need to be formulated and a government–farmers partnership should be forged to facilitate farmers’ access to domestic and international organic food markets.

Read the full article here

Title: One size policy does not fit all: latent farmer groups in crop insurance markets in Finland

Author(s): Sami Myyrä and Petri Liesivaara

Abstract: This paper assesses how farmers differ in their willingness to pay (WTP) for crop insurance. Data from a choice experiment were analysed using the latent class approach to reveal the number of latent groups and differences in farmers’ WTP for crop insurance in Finland. The analysis identified three homogeneous groups that differed significantly from each other. Farmers in these classes were characterized as ‘catastrophic loss preventers’, ‘risk lovers’ and ‘shallow loss preventers’ based on their implicit prices for insurance attributes. The outputs provide valuable information when these latent groups are connected to farm typology. The results indicate that the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is not sufficiently flexible to take into account the differing needs of farmers for agricultural risk management. If the EU is to implement efficient risk management policies for agriculture, flexibility will be needed in the legislation, and shallow loss insurances will also need to be introduced to cover all risk prevention needs equally.

Read the full article here

Title: Influence of the CAP reform on livestock: outlook for selected European regions by 2020

Author(s): Giacomo Giannoccaro, Rosaria Viscecchia and Bernardo C. De Gennaro

Abstract: Livestock producers have been widely affected by past reforms of the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). This paper analyses the post-2013 CAP influences on farmer decision making in terms of how many livestock units to keep on-farm under the ‘with’ and ‘without’ CAP scenarios. The analysis is based on a survey of 1,301 specialized livestock farms across nine European member states carried out in 2009. The changes in trend in the number of animals reared take into account the different livestock typologies. The results show that the member states that have most recently gained accession are most sensitive to CAP reform, along with organic farming and livestock systems located in hilly and mountainous areas. All are expected to show a decline in their numbers of livestock, while specialist dairy units are expected to increase.

Read the full article here

Title: A meta-regression analysis of price transmission estimates in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author(s): Joseph Amikuzuno and Kolawole Ogundari

Abstract: This study used data from 43 price transmission (PT) studies in Sub-Saharan Africa to conduct a meta-regression analysis to assess how study-specific attributes caused heterogeneity in reported PT coefficients, and to determine the probability of reporting asymmetric price transmission (APT) in selected primary studies. The study found that the reported coefficients varied significantly when published in conference papers, when monthly data were used, when the focus was on a food crop commodity, when the parity bound model was used and when the research was conducted across sub-regions in Sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, the probability of reporting of APT increased with the publication year and among studies conducted in western and eastern Africa relative to studies for southern Africa; conversely, the probability decreased among studies published as conference papers and those that used co-integration techniques. These findings highlight the critical role of selected attributes in determining the magnitude of and the inferences drawn from PT coefficients, and the probability of identifying APT in such coefficients. Overall, the findings suggest that future researchers should pay attention to study-specific characteristics when modelling PT in order to advance our understanding and the policy relevance of inter-market and vertical price transmission, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Read the full article here

Copyright 2016 IP Publishing Ltd.